Notes from the Studio

a collection of works by students of the 2019-2020 Advanced Seminar Program

The collection of works on view here aim to reveal each artist’s process while working in the studio.

Over the past year, this group of artists have shared readings, discussions, critiques, and lectures as part of an experimental seminar led by Mike Magrath, Klara Glosova, and me, Kimberly Trowbridge.

This seminar was designed for atelier graduates as a forum for challenging and expanding one’s level of inquiry in the studio. Our goal has been to help students construct a rigorous and sustainable practice outside of the classroom setting.

It is a revelation for many artists to shift the focus onto the questions, rather than the answers, in one’s work. To find pleasure, curiosity and surprise in the process itself and to learn to articulate that process as a means for self-discovery and awareness. I believe in this method as a fulfilling, lifelong journey for the artist and as a means for delving deeper into one’s unique vision.

The artist must be willing to exist on the line between the known and the unknown and to create a practice that encourages and supports that existence.

It has been a true pleasure working with this motivated and intelligent group of artists and to witness their growth as creative thinkers.

With Gratitude,
Kimberly Trowbridge

ORDER OF ARTISTS

Nan Herbert ● Nancy Bocek ●  Nick Riesland ● David Sun ● Anna Guarneri ● Sally Shintaffer ● Pamela Robinson  

NAN HERBERT
Collage Study of Lippi + Rubens
Paper collage, 7.5 x 23, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
For this series, I used collage and printmaking to create iterations of master studies based on two old master paintings arranged side by side to create a frieze: The Annunciation (Filippo Lippi, 1450) and Allegory on the Blessings of Peace (Peter Paul Rubens, 1630).
In the collages, I emphasized the common pattern of dark verticals I saw in the two master paintings—the Lippi interior and Rubens exterior—with the goal of having the composition read as a whole.
NAN HERBERT
Collage Study of Rubens
Paper collage, 7.5 x 11.5, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
For this series, I used collage and printmaking to create iterations of master studies based on two old master paintings arranged side by side to create a frieze: The Annunciation (Filippo Lippi, 1450) and Allegory on the Blessings of Peace (Peter Paul Rubens, 1630).
In the collages, I emphasized the common pattern of dark verticals I saw in the two master paintings—the Lippi interior and Rubens exterior—with the goal of having the composition read as a whole.
NAN HERBERT
Diptych Study of Lippi
Monotype with oil based inks on BFK Rives paper, 15 x 22.5, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
To create the prints, I divided both master paintings in half to create four sections. Initially, I approached the prints as I did the collages by representing the figures abstractly and emphasizing the common language of dark verticals.
NAN HERBERT
Diptych Study of Rubens
Monotype with oil based inks on BFK Rives paper, 15 x 22.5, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
To create the prints, I divided both master paintings in half to create four sections. Initially, I approached the prints as I did the collages by representing the figures abstractly and emphasizing the common language of dark verticals.
NAN HERBERT
Study of Rubens LHS
Monotype with oil based inks on Masa paper, 15 x 10.5, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
I based recent prints on close observations of the master paintings, however, which influenced both the way I represented the figures and structured the spaces.
NAN HERBERT
Diptych Study of Rubens LHS + RHS
Monotype with oil based ink on Masa paper, 15 x 21, NFS (work in progress)

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
I based recent prints on close observations of the master paintings, however, which influenced both the way I represented the figures and structured the spaces.
NAN HERBERT
Studies of Lippi RHS and Rubens LHS
Monotype with oil based inks on Masa paper, 15 x 10.5 each, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The layering process inherent in printmaking furthered my understanding of how space is layered in the two master paintings; the Lippi figures sit in a deep perspectival space whereas the Rubens figures exist in a shallow space created by the layering of figures themselves.
An idea for the next iteration of the series emerged to me as I shifted from thinking about the composition as a whole to considering it as a collection of parts: I am interested in the unexpectedness that results from contrasting rather than resolving the structural differences between the two master paintings when they are combined to form a frieze. I plan to explore this complexity as I continue to work on the series.
NANCY BOCEK
Barrier
sharing one form female/male.
A two-sided form of black clay with underglaze and THHN wire, 21.5 x 25 x 21 (H x W x D), NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
This is a snapshot of how Barrier evolved through conceptualizing, making and being seen.
Narrowing my field of vision to black clay and orange underglaze, the human figure and the spike form helped to isolate the beauty and meaning that each brings to the table.
By simplifying, I discovered shifting meanings useful for my considerations.
Black clay: ground, solid, eternal, pure, night and dark.
The block form: human-construct, a barrier, wall, opposite and shared circumstance.
Hot orange: passion, need, sorrow, danger and risk.
A simple five sided “spike”: civilization building, patriarchy, power and empowerment, anger, aggression and sacrifice.
Wire: line, movement, linkage, binding, constraint and opening to possibilities.
Once the thought became a completed work, my project expanded into an exploration of how the exhibiting environment nuances meaning as a stage sets the scene for its audience.
My finding is that thought formed into an artwork is not ever “completed” but continues to challenge me to have a wider perspective.
NANCY BOCEK
Sketched thoughts

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
This is a snapshot of how Barrier evolved through conceptualizing, making and being seen.
Narrowing my field of vision to black clay and orange underglaze, the human figure and the spike form helped to isolate the beauty and meaning that each brings to the table.
By simplifying, I discovered shifting meanings useful for my considerations.
Black clay: ground, solid, eternal, pure, night and dark.
The block form: human-construct, a barrier, wall, opposite and shared circumstance.
Hot orange: passion, need, sorrow, danger and risk.
A simple five sided “spike”: civilization building, patriarchy, power and empowerment, anger, aggression and sacrifice.
Wire: line, movement, linkage, binding, constraint and opening to possibilities.
Once the thought became a completed work, my project expanded into an exploration of how the exhibiting environment nuances meaning as a stage sets the scene for its audience.
My finding is that thought formed into an artwork is not ever “completed” but continues to challenge me to have a wider perspective.
NANCY BOCEK
Thought to clay

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
This is a snapshot of how Barrier evolved through conceptualizing, making and being seen.
Narrowing my field of vision to black clay and orange underglaze, the human figure and the spike form helped to isolate the beauty and meaning that each brings to the table.
By simplifying, I discovered shifting meanings useful for my considerations.
Black clay: ground, solid, eternal, pure, night and dark.
The block form: human-construct, a barrier, wall, opposite and shared circumstance.
Hot orange: passion, need, sorrow, danger and risk.
A simple five sided “spike”: civilization building, patriarchy, power and empowerment, anger, aggression and sacrifice.
Wire: line, movement, linkage, binding, constraint and opening to possibilities.
Once the thought became a completed work, my project expanded into an exploration of how the exhibiting environment nuances meaning as a stage sets the scene for its audience.
My finding is that thought formed into an artwork is not ever “completed” but continues to challenge me to have a wider perspective.
NANCY BOCEK
Spike thought

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
This is a snapshot of how Barrier evolved through conceptualizing, making and being seen.
Narrowing my field of vision to black clay and orange underglaze, the human figure and the spike form helped to isolate the beauty and meaning that each brings to the table.
By simplifying, I discovered shifting meanings useful for my considerations.
Black clay: ground, solid, eternal, pure, night and dark.
The block form: human-construct, a barrier, wall, opposite and shared circumstance.
Hot orange: passion, need, sorrow, danger and risk.
A simple five sided “spike”: civilization building, patriarchy, power and empowerment, anger, aggression and sacrifice.
Wire: line, movement, linkage, binding, constraint and opening to possibilities.
Once the thought became a completed work, my project expanded into an exploration of how the exhibiting environment nuances meaning as a stage sets the scene for its audience.
My finding is that thought formed into an artwork is not ever “completed” but continues to challenge me to have a wider perspective.
NANCY BOCEK
A performance
about nature and humanity on a path is a quiet contemplation, while a scene of aggressive line and angle is an unsettling tale.

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
This is a snapshot of how Barrier evolved through conceptualizing, making and being seen.
Narrowing my field of vision to black clay and orange underglaze, the human figure and the spike form helped to isolate the beauty and meaning that each brings to the table.
By simplifying, I discovered shifting meanings useful for my considerations.
Black clay: ground, solid, eternal, pure, night and dark.
The block form: human-construct, a barrier, wall, opposite and shared circumstance.
Hot orange: passion, need, sorrow, danger and risk.
A simple five sided “spike”: civilization building, patriarchy, power and empowerment, anger, aggression and sacrifice.
Wire: line, movement, linkage, binding, constraint and opening to possibilities.
Once the thought became a completed work, my project expanded into an exploration of how the exhibiting environment nuances meaning as a stage sets the scene for its audience.
My finding is that thought formed into an artwork is not ever “completed” but continues to challenge me to have a wider perspective.
NANCY BOCEK
A dialog
energized through contrast of dark against light or as a quiet soliloquy of ceramic, concrete and earth.

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
This is a snapshot of how Barrier evolved through conceptualizing, making and being seen.
Narrowing my field of vision to black clay and orange underglaze, the human figure and the spike form helped to isolate the beauty and meaning that each brings to the table.
By simplifying, I discovered shifting meanings useful for my considerations.
Black clay: ground, solid, eternal, pure, night and dark.
The block form: human-construct, a barrier, wall, opposite and shared circumstance.
Hot orange: passion, need, sorrow, danger and risk.
A simple five sided “spike”: civilization building, patriarchy, power and empowerment, anger, aggression and sacrifice.
Wire: line, movement, linkage, binding, constraint and opening to possibilities.
Once the thought became a completed work, my project expanded into an exploration of how the exhibiting environment nuances meaning as a stage sets the scene for its audience.
My finding is that thought formed into an artwork is not ever “completed” but continues to challenge me to have a wider perspective.
NANCY BOCEK
Detail

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
This is a snapshot of how Barrier evolved through conceptualizing, making and being seen.
Narrowing my field of vision to black clay and orange underglaze, the human figure and the spike form helped to isolate the beauty and meaning that each brings to the table.
By simplifying, I discovered shifting meanings useful for my considerations.
Black clay: ground, solid, eternal, pure, night and dark.
The block form: human-construct, a barrier, wall, opposite and shared circumstance.
Hot orange: passion, need, sorrow, danger and risk.
A simple five sided “spike”: civilization building, patriarchy, power and empowerment, anger, aggression and sacrifice.
Wire: line, movement, linkage, binding, constraint and opening to possibilities.
Once the thought became a completed work, my project expanded into an exploration of how the exhibiting environment nuances meaning as a stage sets the scene for its audience.
My finding is that thought formed into an artwork is not ever “completed” but continues to challenge me to have a wider perspective.
NICK RIESLAND
The Violinist, 2020
Oil on canvas, 30 x 40, $700

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The reference for this painting is a photo that I took of jazz/blues violinist Anne Harris at the July 2019 Winthrop Rhythm & Blues Festival in Eastern Washington’s Methow Valley.
NICK RIESLAND
In the Shadows, 2020
Oil on canvas pad, 18 x 24, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The reference for this semi-abstract painting is a photo taken decades ago amongst ancient ruins.
NICK RIESLAND
Fruit Bowl, 2020
Oil on canvas, 18 x 20, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
Painting done quickly. Reference is Georges Braque.
NICK RIESLAND
Fruit Bowl II, 2020
Oil on canvas pad, 18 x 20, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The reference is a collage interpretation of a 1909 painting of a fruit dish by Georges Braque.
NICK RIESLAND
Fruit Bowl, Fauvist, 2020
Acrylic on canvas, 18 x 20, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The reference is a collage interpretation of a 1909 painting of a fruit dish by Georges Braque.
NICK RIESLAND
Camus, Study 1, 2020
Oil on paper, 9 x 12, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The reference for this photo is a 1940s black and white photo of French/Algerian novelist, Albert Camus. One of his most noteworthy novels is entitled The Plague. The protagonist is a physician in an Algerian seaport that is quarantined due to Bubonic Plague. This novel fit my mood as we were entering into the early weeks of our current COVID-19 pandemic. This painting is the first of three dealing with Camus.
NICK RIESLAND
Camus, Study 22020
Oil on canvas pad, 18 x 22, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
Second painting in this mini-series. The structural reference for this painting is a collage that I constructed. The blue hand suggests the work of the doctor in this stricken North African seaport city. The facial coloration points to emotion in addition to mortality.
NICK RIESLAND
Camus, Study 3, 2020
Oil on canvas pad, 18 x 20, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The reference for this painting is a collage that I constructed, exploring the impossible situation and turmoil caused by the rat/flea-borne Bubonic Plague depicted in Camus’ novel that the doctor pictured must contend with in a life-and-death struggle.
NICK RIESLAND
The Act of Killing 1, 2020
Oil on canvas pad, 18 x 20, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
This painting is based on the 2012 Oscar-nominated documentary, The Act of Killing, by London-based filmmaker Joshua Oppenheimer. The movie considers the cultural consequences of a genocide that occured in Indonesia during 1967. The reference for this painting is a collage that I constructed from photos taken from the movie as well as Indonesian batik designs from my own sources. This is the first in what I hope will be a series of several paintings inspired by this disturbing film. I lived in Jakarta from 1999 through 2002 and Joshua’s work pointed to much of the menace that I felt but didn’t understand during my time in that society. I am grateful for Joshua Oppenheimer’s support of my efforts on this project.
NICK RIESLAND
How Many Moons?, 2020
Oil on canvas pad, 18 x 20, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
A visual allegory of that which has invaded our world. The reference for this painting is a take off on a 1902 silent sci-fi film by Georges Melies, Journey to the Moon. In this case I added cartoon versions of the coronavirus spike proteins in addition to the other features in the painting. Fragmentation could be one theme as well as a wondering as to how long this will last and our society endure. The sky is fragmented. The moon is fragmented. The enigmatic features of this viral “being” are fractured. The virus is criminal, a thug or godfather, and it is unconcerned about its victims and is indifferent as to whether or not we humans are making any efforts to combat or avoid it. Its appetite is voracious and like a fire, it will continue to burn as long as fuel is present. Instead of a rocket ship, I’ve injected a glimmer of hope in depicting a bullet, possibly representing a vaccine. We shall see.
NICK RIESLAND
N8, Home from Appointment, 2020
Oil on canvas pad, 18 x 20, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The reference for this painting is a collage that I constructed that itself referenced a black and white photo of one of my art mentors, Nathan, who is currently in an MFA program at the New York Academy of Art. The occasion is his 41st birthday and his partner sent out photos and requested images of various portraits from his friends and colleagues for the event. I sent her a .jpeg of the collage and then subsequently decided to paint it. Thus…
DAVID SUN
Just Comply and Get a Haircut

Acrylic on paper, 36 x 84, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
In some ways, my studio practice has suffered similar upheaval and lack of normality as the world around it. Finding space to work, time, and supplies have all been impacted. In order to keep up regular practice, I tried to create structure, at times forcing it. First, I focused on simple subjects immediately in front of me, and experimented with varying styles of paint handling. Later, I returned to a meaningful work from the past and re-imagined it, trying to apply lessons I learned over the past years. I planned to follow this piece with more like it, exploring memorable landscapes from quasi-quarantine, but I reached a point I could no longer insulate my practice and subject matter from the events surrounding me. Seemingly out of necessity, I created a topical piece in response to these strong feelings, something very atypical for me. Looking forward, I plan to return to previously planned projects and explore what it means to make them during this time, while remaining open to pursuing more topical pieces as the need arises.
DAVID SUN
Houseplant Stilllife

Oil on canvas, 16 x 24, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
In some ways, my studio practice has suffered similar upheaval and lack of normality as the world around it. Finding space to work, time, and supplies have all been impacted. In order to keep up regular practice, I tried to create structure, at times forcing it. First, I focused on simple subjects immediately in front of me, and experimented with varying styles of paint handling. Later, I returned to a meaningful work from the past and re-imagined it, trying to apply lessons I learned over the past years. I planned to follow this piece with more like it, exploring memorable landscapes from quasi-quarantine, but I reached a point I could no longer insulate my practice and subject matter from the events surrounding me. Seemingly out of necessity, I created a topical piece in response to these strong feelings, something very atypical for me. Looking forward, I plan to return to previously planned projects and explore what it means to make them during this time, while remaining open to pursuing more topical pieces as the need arises.
DAVID SUN
Greenlake Ducks

Oil on linen, 11 x 16, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
In some ways, my studio practice has suffered similar upheaval and lack of normality as the world around it. Finding space to work, time, and supplies have all been impacted. In order to keep up regular practice, I tried to create structure, at times forcing it. First, I focused on simple subjects immediately in front of me, and experimented with varying styles of paint handling. Later, I returned to a meaningful work from the past and re-imagined it, trying to apply lessons I learned over the past years. I planned to follow this piece with more like it, exploring memorable landscapes from quasi-quarantine, but I reached a point I could no longer insulate my practice and subject matter from the events surrounding me. Seemingly out of necessity, I created a topical piece in response to these strong feelings, something very atypical for me. Looking forward, I plan to return to previously planned projects and explore what it means to make them during this time, while remaining open to pursuing more topical pieces as the need arises.
DAVID SUN
Return to Ozette

Oil on canvas, 72 x 48, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
In some ways, my studio practice has suffered similar upheaval and lack of normality as the world around it. Finding space to work, time, and supplies have all been impacted. In order to keep up regular practice, I tried to create structure, at times forcing it. First, I focused on simple subjects immediately in front of me, and experimented with varying styles of paint handling. Later, I returned to a meaningful work from the past and re-imagined it, trying to apply lessons I learned over the past years. I planned to follow this piece with more like it, exploring memorable landscapes from quasi-quarantine, but I reached a point I could no longer insulate my practice and subject matter from the events surrounding me. Seemingly out of necessity, I created a topical piece in response to these strong feelings, something very atypical for me. Looking forward, I plan to return to previously planned projects and explore what it means to make them during this time, while remaining open to pursuing more topical pieces as the need arises.
ANNA GUARNERI
Untitled (3-1)
Stained glass, 12 x 13, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
I have recently come back to stained glass after a long time away. As a medium, it is ideal for playing with texture, opacity, and color. I have been re-working forms from my paintings, experimenting with variations, and on good days, delighting in the process. Stained glass is often used architecturally, but I think of these pieces as paintings and sculptures. I’ve been spending time with images of Thomas Nozkowski paintings, thinking about what gives them the qualities I admire – surprising color combinations, shapes that are assertive but elusive, compositions that are somehow both unstable and grounded. It’s a challenge to bring Nozkowski’s kind of improvisation into the medium of stained glass, but I’ve been trying to make less obvious choices, hoping that if I can surprise myself, I can surprise others too.
ANNA GUARNERI
Untitled (3-2)
Stained glass, 12 x 13, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
I have recently come back to stained glass after a long time away. As a medium, it is ideal for playing with texture, opacity, and color. I have been re-working forms from my paintings, experimenting with variations, and on good days, delighting in the process. Stained glass is often used architecturally, but I think of these pieces as paintings and sculptures. I’ve been spending time with images of Thomas Nozkowski paintings, thinking about what gives them the qualities I admire – surprising color combinations, shapes that are assertive but elusive, compositions that are somehow both unstable and grounded. It’s a challenge to bring Nozkowski’s kind of improvisation into the medium of stained glass, but I’ve been trying to make less obvious choices, hoping that if I can surprise myself, I can surprise others too.
ANNA GUARNERI
Untitled (3-3)
Stained glass, 12 x 13, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
I have recently come back to stained glass after a long time away. As a medium, it is ideal for playing with texture, opacity, and color. I have been re-working forms from my paintings, experimenting with variations, and on good days, delighting in the process. Stained glass is often used architecturally, but I think of these pieces as paintings and sculptures. I’ve been spending time with images of Thomas Nozkowski paintings, thinking about what gives them the qualities I admire – surprising color combinations, shapes that are assertive but elusive, compositions that are somehow both unstable and grounded. It’s a challenge to bring Nozkowski’s kind of improvisation into the medium of stained glass, but I’ve been trying to make less obvious choices, hoping that if I can surprise myself, I can surprise others too.
ANNA GUARNERI
Untitled (3-4)
Stained glass, 12 x 13, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
I have recently come back to stained glass after a long time away. As a medium, it is ideal for playing with texture, opacity, and color. I have been re-working forms from my paintings, experimenting with variations, and on good days, delighting in the process. Stained glass is often used architecturally, but I think of these pieces as paintings and sculptures. I’ve been spending time with images of Thomas Nozkowski paintings, thinking about what gives them the qualities I admire – surprising color combinations, shapes that are assertive but elusive, compositions that are somehow both unstable and grounded. It’s a challenge to bring Nozkowski’s kind of improvisation into the medium of stained glass, but I’ve been trying to make less obvious choices, hoping that if I can surprise myself, I can surprise others too.
ANNA GUARNERI
Untitled (4-1)
Stained glass and concrete, 5 x 6, $160

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
I have recently come back to stained glass after a long time away. As a medium, it is ideal for playing with texture, opacity, and color. I have been re-working forms from my paintings, experimenting with variations, and on good days, delighting in the process. Stained glass is often used architecturally, but I think of these pieces as paintings and sculptures. I’ve been spending time with images of Thomas Nozkowski paintings, thinking about what gives them the qualities I admire – surprising color combinations, shapes that are assertive but elusive, compositions that are somehow both unstable and grounded. It’s a challenge to bring Nozkowski’s kind of improvisation into the medium of stained glass, but I’ve been trying to make less obvious choices, hoping that if I can surprise myself, I can surprise others too.
ANNA GUARNERI
Untitled (4-2)
Stained glass and concrete, 5 x 5, $150

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
I have recently come back to stained glass after a long time away. As a medium, it is ideal for playing with texture, opacity, and color. I have been re-working forms from my paintings, experimenting with variations, and on good days, delighting in the process. Stained glass is often used architecturally, but I think of these pieces as paintings and sculptures. I’ve been spending time with images of Thomas Nozkowski paintings, thinking about what gives them the qualities I admire – surprising color combinations, shapes that are assertive but elusive, compositions that are somehow both unstable and grounded. It’s a challenge to bring Nozkowski’s kind of improvisation into the medium of stained glass, but I’ve been trying to make less obvious choices, hoping that if I can surprise myself, I can surprise others too.
ANNA GUARNERI
Untitled (4-3)
Stained glass and concrete, 5 x 6, $180

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
I have recently come back to stained glass after a long time away. As a medium, it is ideal for playing with texture, opacity, and color. I have been re-working forms from my paintings, experimenting with variations, and on good days, delighting in the process. Stained glass is often used architecturally, but I think of these pieces as paintings and sculptures. I’ve been spending time with images of Thomas Nozkowski paintings, thinking about what gives them the qualities I admire – surprising color combinations, shapes that are assertive but elusive, compositions that are somehow both unstable and grounded. It’s a challenge to bring Nozkowski’s kind of improvisation into the medium of stained glass, but I’ve been trying to make less obvious choices, hoping that if I can surprise myself, I can surprise others too.
ANNA GUARNERI
Untitled (4-4)
Stained glass and concrete, 5 x 7, $170

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
I have recently come back to stained glass after a long time away. As a medium, it is ideal for playing with texture, opacity, and color. I have been re-working forms from my paintings, experimenting with variations, and on good days, delighting in the process. Stained glass is often used architecturally, but I think of these pieces as paintings and sculptures. I’ve been spending time with images of Thomas Nozkowski paintings, thinking about what gives them the qualities I admire – surprising color combinations, shapes that are assertive but elusive, compositions that are somehow both unstable and grounded. It’s a challenge to bring Nozkowski’s kind of improvisation into the medium of stained glass, but I’ve been trying to make less obvious choices, hoping that if I can surprise myself, I can surprise others too.
SALLY SHINTAFFER
With Ancients
Monoprint, 11 x 14, NFS


ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
A few months ago I began making multi-layered mono prints at home, a trial and error process using water-based inks, a pin press, Japanese printing paper and, occasionally, newsprint. I am curious about mono print for its own sake, but also thought it an interesting media to combine with painting and collage. Women are front and center in these prints and print collages. Though they’ve modified over time and are sometimes obscured, the figures were initially inspired by Milton Avery paintings and roles of women in mythology. Their bold, sturdy postures imply strength and trustworthiness, their intimacy with one another a potential for action and purpose. Each figure is enhanced by the presence of others standing nearby.
SALLY SHINTAFFER
Congregation With Dawn
Monoprint & collage, 11 x 14, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
A few months ago I began making multi-layered mono prints at home, a trial and error process using water-based inks, a pin press, Japanese printing paper and, occasionally, newsprint. I am curious about mono print for its own sake, but also thought it an interesting media to combine with painting and collage. Women are front and center in these prints and print collages. Though they’ve modified over time and are sometimes obscured, the figures were initially inspired by Milton Avery paintings and roles of women in mythology. Their bold, sturdy postures imply strength and trustworthiness, their intimacy with one another a potential for action and purpose. Each figure is enhanced by the presence of others standing nearby.
SALLY SHINTAFFER
With Midnight
Monoprint & collage, 11 x 14, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
A few months ago I began making multi-layered mono prints at home, a trial and error process using water-based inks, a pin press, Japanese printing paper and, occasionally, newsprint. I am curious about mono print for its own sake, but also thought it an interesting media to combine with painting and collage. Women are front and center in these prints and print collages. Though they’ve modified over time and are sometimes obscured, the figures were initially inspired by Milton Avery paintings and roles of women in mythology. Their bold, sturdy postures imply strength and trustworthiness, their intimacy with one another a potential for action and purpose. Each figure is enhanced by the presence of others standing nearby.
SALLY SHINTAFFER
In Congregation
Monoprint, 9 x 12, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
A few months ago I began making multi-layered mono prints at home, a trial and error process using water-based inks, a pin press, Japanese printing paper and, occasionally, newsprint. I am curious about mono print for its own sake, but also thought it an interesting media to combine with painting and collage. Women are front and center in these prints and print collages. Though they’ve modified over time and are sometimes obscured, the figures were initially inspired by Milton Avery paintings and roles of women in mythology. Their bold, sturdy postures imply strength and trustworthiness, their intimacy with one another a potential for action and purpose. Each figure is enhanced by the presence of others standing nearby.
SALLY SHINTAFFER
At Noon
Monoprint, 9 x 12, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
A few months ago I began making multi-layered mono prints at home, a trial and error process using water-based inks, a pin press, Japanese printing paper and, occasionally, newsprint. I am curious about mono print for its own sake, but also thought it an interesting media to combine with painting and collage. Women are front and center in these prints and print collages. Though they’ve modified over time and are sometimes obscured, the figures were initially inspired by Milton Avery paintings and roles of women in mythology. Their bold, sturdy postures imply strength and trustworthiness, their intimacy with one another a potential for action and purpose. Each figure is enhanced by the presence of others standing nearby.
SALLY SHINTAFFER
With Serpent
Monoprint, 9 x 12, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
A few months ago I began making multi-layered mono prints at home, a trial and error process using water-based inks, a pin press, Japanese printing paper and, occasionally, newsprint. I am curious about mono print for its own sake, but also thought it an interesting media to combine with painting and collage. Women are front and center in these prints and print collages. Though they’ve modified over time and are sometimes obscured, the figures were initially inspired by Milton Avery paintings and roles of women in mythology. Their bold, sturdy postures imply strength and trustworthiness, their intimacy with one another a potential for action and purpose. Each figure is enhanced by the presence of others standing nearby.
SALLY SHINTAFFER
With Serpents
Monoprint, 9 x 12, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
A few months ago I began making multi-layered mono prints at home, a trial and error process using water-based inks, a pin press, Japanese printing paper and, occasionally, newsprint. I am curious about mono print for its own sake, but also thought it an interesting media to combine with painting and collage. Women are front and center in these prints and print collages. Though they’ve modified over time and are sometimes obscured, the figures were initially inspired by Milton Avery paintings and roles of women in mythology. Their bold, sturdy postures imply strength and trustworthiness, their intimacy with one another a potential for action and purpose. Each figure is enhanced by the presence of others standing nearby.
SALLY SHINTAFFER
Duos
Monoprint & collage, 18 x 9, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
A few months ago I began making multi-layered mono prints at home, a trial and error process using water-based inks, a pin press, Japanese printing paper and, occasionally, newsprint. I am curious about mono print for its own sake, but also thought it an interesting media to combine with painting and collage. Women are front and center in these prints and print collages. Though they’ve modified over time and are sometimes obscured, the figures were initially inspired by Milton Avery paintings and roles of women in mythology. Their bold, sturdy postures imply strength and trustworthiness, their intimacy with one another a potential for action and purpose. Each figure is enhanced by the presence of others standing nearby.
PAMELA ROBINSON
Forest Study 1
These studies are imagined forest scenes taken from photos I took in the Alaskan Rainforest near Juneau and the Denali National Park.

Oil on Vellum, 8 x 10, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The rainforest forest is a fecund, transient and visually chaotic place to which I feel a primordial connection. I want to paint a feeling of being in the forest, rather than copying an exact visual scene and to explore figure/ground relationships, broken light sources and paint application. “I am trying to break out of something, break out of what I called obsessive naturalism.” (David Hockney)
PAMELA ROBINSON
Forest Study 2
Depth in the forest is visible only in bits and pieces, with nature’s hand as the lighting director.

Oil on vellum, 8 x 10, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The rainforest forest is a fecund, transient and visually chaotic place to which I feel a primordial connection. I want to paint a feeling of being in the forest, rather than copying an exact visual scene and to explore figure/ground relationships, broken light sources and paint application. “I am trying to break out of something, break out of what I called obsessive naturalism.” (David Hockney)
PAMELA ROBINSON
Forest Study 3
Oil on vellum, 8 x 8, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The rainforest forest is a fecund, transient and visually chaotic place to which I feel a primordial connection. I want to paint a feeling of being in the forest, rather than copying an exact visual scene and to explore figure/ground relationships, broken light sources and paint application. “I am trying to break out of something, break out of what I called obsessive naturalism.” (David Hockney)
PAMELA ROBINSON
Forest Study 4
Drawn from the collage.

Ink on vellum, 11 x 14, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The rainforest forest is a fecund, transient and visually chaotic place to which I feel a primordial connection. I want to paint a feeling of being in the forest, rather than copying an exact visual scene and to explore figure/ground relationships, broken light sources and paint application. “I am trying to break out of something, break out of what I called obsessive naturalism.” (David Hockney)
PAMELA ROBINSON
untitled
Cut outs from resized pieces taken from photos of the rainforest and Denali National Park.

Collage, 11 x 14, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The rainforest forest is a fecund, transient and visually chaotic place to which I feel a primordial connection. I want to paint a feeling of being in the forest, rather than copying an exact visual scene and to explore figure/ground relationships, broken light sources and paint application. “I am trying to break out of something, break out of what I called obsessive naturalism.” (David Hockney)
PAMELA ROBINSON
Dwellers
The shades of green in the forest are overwhelming, from the verdant blankets of moss to the vines twisting among the thick cover of trees, their branches laden with lichen. Painting done from Studies.

Oil on canvas, 24 x 30, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The rainforest forest is a fecund, transient and visually chaotic place to which I feel a primordial connection. I want to paint a feeling of being in the forest, rather than copying an exact visual scene and to explore figure/ground relationships, broken light sources and paint application. “I am trying to break out of something, break out of what I called obsessive naturalism.” (David Hockney)
PAMELA ROBINSON
Fishing Lessons
Cubs fishing on the Kenai Peninsula.

Oil on canvas, 24 x 30, NFS

ARTIST STATEMENT
———–
The rainforest forest is a fecund, transient and visually chaotic place to which I feel a primordial connection. I want to paint a feeling of being in the forest, rather than copying an exact visual scene and to explore figure/ground relationships, broken light sources and paint application. “I am trying to break out of something, break out of what I called obsessive naturalism.” (David Hockney)

Artwork in this collection is available for purchase, with pick-ups at Gage Academy of Art in Capitol Hill. If interested or for more information on artwork pickup and delivery, please contact Event & Exhibition Manager Erica LeSuer at lesuer.e@gageacademy.org.