KRISTIN SIMPSON
Calligraphic Notes
Acrylic on canvas, 24 x 18, NFS
KRISTIN SIMPSON
A Stilled Life in the time of COVID-19
Oil on board, 22 x 15, NFS

We never got a chance to finish making a still life, so I started this one from home. It includes objects that have become part of our quarantined life. It was painted in the bathroom – the small space available for art. There is a glimpse in the mirror of the life outside and the way things used to be.
KRISTIN SIMPSON
Signs of Disgust
Clay and acrylic paint, 10” tall, NFS
YINGZHAO LIU
Bear mountain
Collagraph monoprint on Rives BFK paper, 11 x15, SOLD

While studying at Gage Academy I developed a series of landscape monoprints, exploring monotype, etching, collagraph, and chine collé. I feel connected to mountains, at once still and timeless, and massive change visible through the surfaces of vegetation, scree, and snow. The significance and insignificance of individuals in a vast landscape—at once beautiful, abundant, and intimidating or threatening, have always drawn me.
YINGZHAO LIU
Sage in the mountains
Monoprint with etching on Rives BFK paper, 11 x 15, $200

I’m interested in the landscape as embodied by spirit, which I’ve felt since I was a child. This one shows my daughter Sage, then one and half years old, sitting on a grassy slope within a vast wilderness. Native Americans say that we are pitiful, not in the sense of pathetic, but in the sense of being small, needing help, in the face of the great spirit.
YINGZHAO LIU
A time of uncertainty Oil on canvas, 10 x 14, $200

I started this self-portrait at the beginning of the COVID-19 outbreak in WA, and chose this posture as I’m one of those people who always have a hand on my face.
JENNA WHITE
A Cottage Remembered Unfinished collage, NFS

My “Dollhouse Series” is a monocular look through the lens of “home.” It’s about home and the familiarity of objects and relationships within the home. Home is comfortable, but there’s a tilted perception to this comfort. I draw on my experience of growing up with dysfunctional parents who tried to provide the comfort of “home,” but something was always off. Sometimes we’re happy, but other times the love slipped away to something untenable.
JENNA WHITE
Holding Tight In A Fracturing World Monotype print, NFS

My “Dollhouse Series” is a monocular look through the lens of “home.” It’s about home and the familiarity of objects and relationships within the home. Home is comfortable, but there’s a tilted perception to this comfort. I draw on my experience of growing up with dysfunctional parents who tried to provide the comfort of “home,” but something was always off. Sometimes we’re happy, but other times the love slipped away to something untenable.
JENNA WHITE
Moody Jazz Oil on paper, NFS

My “Dollhouse Series” is a monocular look through the lens of “home.” It’s about home and the familiarity of objects and relationships within the home. Home is comfortable, but there’s a tilted perception to this comfort. I draw on my experience of growing up with dysfunctional parents who tried to provide the comfort of “home,” but something was always off. Sometimes we’re happy, but other times the love slipped away to something untenable.
STEPHEN EWING
Shoebill Stork
Collage, charcoal, and pen drawing on panel, NFS

What will it take for us to acknowledge climate change? Will we wait until birds make personal threats to our families? Will wild dogs need to display their gang tattoos prominently? Perhaps we need to be forced to live with gasoline guzzling cyborg hummingbirds to come to our senses. If these OBVIOUS harbingers of the future are ignored can we honestly claim innocence? It’s all getting a bit ridiculous if you ask me.
STEPHEN EWING
Cerebus, a third
Monotype print on paper, NFS

What will it take for us to acknowledge climate change? Will we wait until birds make personal threats to our families? Will wild dogs need to display their gang tattoos prominently? Perhaps we need to be forced to live with gasoline guzzling cyborg hummingbirds to come to our senses. If these OBVIOUS harbingers of the future are ignored can we honestly claim innocence? It’s all getting a bit ridiculous if you ask me.
STEPHEN EWING
Hummingborg
Monotype print on paper, NFS

What will it take for us to acknowledge climate change? Will we wait until birds make personal threats to our families? Will wild dogs need to display their gang tattoos prominently? Perhaps we need to be forced to live with gasoline guzzling cyborg hummingbirds to come to our senses. If these OBVIOUS harbingers of the future are ignored can we honestly claim innocence? It’s all getting a bit ridiculous if you ask me.
GINI FALLER
Kaytee
Charcoal on paper, 20 x 16, NFS

Coming into SAI, I was terrified of figure drawing. Geoff’s and Grace’s techniques made it possible and Kaytee’s exquisite poses made it fun.
“To be an artist is to believe in life.” – Henry Moore
I am nearing 70 years of age but, although art has been a major part of my life, I feel as though I am, not a newborn exactly, but perhaps finally a toddler, overjoyed at the chance to try whatever I can, taste everything and revel in it all. My style is evolving with many fits, starts and side trips, abstract expressionism remains a constant. I luxuriate in the depth achievable with oil and encaustic paints but have also started to enjoy the freedom of acrylic paints and media. Whatever my medium, method or apparent subject matter, the people and places I love are always in my work.
GINI FALLER
Golden Boy
Oil on canvas, 20 x 16, NFS

From a photo taken in 1976, a few months before my brother’s death. I tried to capture the meshing of the golden hues of my brother’s skin, his hair and the Eastern Washington high desert. The approaching storm clouds are not in the original photograph.
“To be an artist is to believe in life.” – Henry Moore
I am nearing 70 years of age but, although art has been a major part of my life, I feel as though I am, not a newborn exactly, but perhaps finally a toddler, overjoyed at the chance to try whatever I can, taste everything and revel in it all. My style is evolving with many fits, starts and side trips, abstract expressionism remains a constant. I luxuriate in the depth achievable with oil and encaustic paints but have also started to enjoy the freedom of acrylic paints and media. Whatever my medium, method or apparent subject matter, the people and places I love are always in my work.
GINI FALLER
Summer at the Fountain #3
Oil on canvas, 20 x 16, NFS

A wonderful summer day at Seattle Center with my nephew resulted in three paintings, two completed after March 11, 2020.
“To be an artist is to believe in life.” – Henry Moore
I am nearing 70 years of age but, although art has been a major part of my life, I feel as though I am, not a newborn exactly, but perhaps finally a toddler, overjoyed at the chance to try whatever I can, taste everything and revel in it all. My style is evolving with many fits, starts and side trips, abstract expressionism remains a constant. I luxuriate in the depth achievable with oil and encaustic paints but have also started to enjoy the freedom of acrylic paints and media. Whatever my medium, method or apparent subject matter, the people and places I love are always in my work.
RENEE HENSON
Draining
Ink on paper, NFS

It’s not that motherhood is particularly sublime or sacred. But what it offers us is a commonplace understandable window into the world of tangible care. It is expressing care through action aimed at the well-being of another person. It’s imperfect and difficult but ultimately unavoidable if we seek maturity. These are works created with ink on paper, some were painted and others were printed.
RENEE HENSON
Embrace
Ink on paper, NFS

It’s not that motherhood is particularly sublime or sacred. But what it offers us is a commonplace understandable window into the world of tangible care. It is expressing care through action aimed at the well-being of another person. It’s imperfect and difficult but ultimately unavoidable if we seek maturity. These are works created with ink on paper, some were painted and others were printed.
RENEE HENSON
The Big Push
Ink on paper, NFS

It’s not that motherhood is particularly sublime or sacred. But what it offers us is a commonplace understandable window into the world of tangible care. It is expressing care through action aimed at the well-being of another person. It’s imperfect and difficult but ultimately unavoidable if we seek maturity. These are works created with ink on paper, some were painted and others were printed.
IRENE PUTNAM
Alinea
Oil on panel, 18 x 24, Price upon request
IRENE PUTNAM
Gloria
Graphite on Bristol, 10 x 9, Price upon request
IRENE PUTNAM
It Wandered
Print, 9 x 12, Price upon request
ARIEL ALVARADO
Wai’anapanapa Key
Oil based ink on watercolor paper (monotype print), 6 x 8, NFS
ARIEL ALVARADO
Timeless Mind
Collage on water paper, 18 x 20, NFS
ARIEL ALVARADO
Drawing Week 9
Sanguine color pencil on drawing paper, 11 x 14, NFS

Artwork in this collection is available for purchase, with pick-ups at Gage Academy of Art in Capitol Hill. If interested or for more information on artwork pickup and delivery, please contact Event & Exhibition Manager Erica LeSuer at lesuer.e@gageacademy.org.